Developmental Milestones

Developmental milestones give doctors, speech therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists and so many other professional a time frame to compare every child’s development. For speech and language milestones, we focus on when a child babbles, says their first word, and other aspects that lead to the child producing speech and language. The American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) produced a really great set of charts that I love to use when looking at a child’s developmental milestones. I am attaching the milestones for birth- 1 year old, but if you want to see other ages visit their website : http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/chart.htm.

Hearing and Understanding Talking

Birth-3 Months

  • Startles to loud sounds
  • Quiets or smiles when spoken to
  • Seems to recognize your voice and quiets if crying
  • Increases or decreases sucking behavior in response to sound
Birth-3 Months

  • Makes pleasure sounds (cooing, gooing)
  • Cries differently for different needs
  • Smiles when sees you
4-6 Months

  • Moves eyes in direction of sounds
  • Responds to changes in tone of your voice
  • Notices toys that make sounds
  • Pays attention to music
4-6 Months

  • Babbling sounds more speech-like with many different sounds, including p, b and m
  • Chuckles and laughs
  • Vocalizes excitement and displeasure
  • Makes gurgling sounds when left alone and when playing with you
7 Months-1 Year

  • Enjoys games like peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake
  • Turns and looks in direction of sounds
  • Listens when spoken to
  • Recognizes words for common items like “cup”, “shoe”, “book”, or “juice”
  • Begins to respond to requests (e.g. “Come here” or “Want more?”)
7 Months-1 Year

  • Babbling has both long and short groups of sounds such as “tata upup bibibibi”
  • Uses speech or noncrying sounds to get and keep attention
  • Uses gestures to communication (waving, holding arms to be picked up)
  • Imitates different speech sounds
  • Has one or two words (hi, dog,dada, mama) around first birthday, although sounds may not be clear

Just remember that if your child doesn’t do something the day they turn a certain age, that doesn’t guarantee that something is wrong! If you are worried always consult with a professional!

-Stephanie

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